Please note that the listings here are only for obituaries that have been found to date. It does not include all those that are listed with readable inscriptions; therefore, we have not yet
cross-referenced them to the tombstone pages. 
Please use the search feature to locate those listed in both directories.

Obituaries

1835
 
Name
Obituary Date
Death Date
Age
3/4/1835
2/25/1835
Infant daughter
6/22/1835
 
Aged 3 years
5/22/1835
5/18/1835
In the 9th year of his age
5/22/1835
5/18/1835
2 years and 8 months
10/2/1835
10/1/1835
Infant son
Amy (A slave of David Morrison)
7/8/1835
 
Aged 45 years
7/8/1835
 
Aged 25 years
7/13/1835
 
Aged 32
6/22/1835
 
3 years of age
6/29/1835
 
Aged 52 years
7/24/1835
 
Aged 1 year
6/29/1835
 
Aged 5 years
11/27/1835
11/26/1835
In the 45th year of her age
6/29/1835
 
Aged 2 years
9/28/1835
9/24/1835
 
7/24/1835
   
Chaney (slave of B. Hodge) 6/22/1835   age 43 years
10/14/1835
10/13/1835
 
Charles (A slave of Edward Trabue)
6/29/1835
 
Aged 35 years
Charlotte (A slave of B. Akin)
6/29/1835
 
Aged 50 years
7/29/1835
7/27/1835
 
6/24/1835
 
Aged 30 years
6/19/1835 and 6/22/1835
6/18/1835
Young gentleman
6/19/1835
 
Aged 46 years
Dolly (A slave of Mrs Talbot)
7/13/1835
 
Aged 65
7/3/1835
 
Aged 2 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 8 years
7/20/1835
 
Aged 25 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 1 year
George (A slave of James N. Meifee)
7/10/1835
7/9/1835
Aged 70 years
4/17/1835
3/27/1835
In the 61st year of his age
6/22/1835
 
Aged 35
Harriet (A slave of Col. S. H. Laughlin)
7/13/1835
 
Aged 8 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 1 year
7/1/1835
 
Aged 16 years
6/29/1835
 
Aged 16 years
6/29/1835
 
Aged 52 years
6/29/1835
 
Aged 26 years
9/30/1835
9/21/1835
In the 45th year of his age
6/19/1835
 
Aged 2 years
5/8/1835
4/26/1835
Child
6/19/1835
   
5/20/1835
5/15/1835
Little boy
6/19/1835
 
Aged 3 years
6/24/1835
 
Aged 55 years
Jacob (A slave of William Parham)
7/8/1835
 
Aged 20 years
Jenney (slave of John Beaty)
6/22/1835
 
Aged 43 years
1/12/1835
1/12/1835
 
7/1/1835
 
Aged 2 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 1 year
Kimbrell (A slave of S.V. D. Stout)
6/29/1835
 
Aged 18 years
2/13/1835
2/5/1835
In her 10th year
6/24/1835
 
Aged 35 years
7/20/1835
 
Aged about 18 years
1/23/1835
1/18/1835
In the 74th year of his age
Maria (A slave of Mary Denney)
7/20/1835
 
Aged 3 years
6/29/1835
 
Aged 35 years
7/1/1835
 
Aged 2 years
Mary (Infant slave of Mrs. G. Paye)
7/3/1835
 
Aged 2 years
7/3/1835
 
Aged 23 years
Maurice (A slave of Judge Kennedy)
7/8/1835
 
Aged 22 years
7/1/1835
 
Aged 24 years
2/13/1835
2/7/1835
 
7/15/1835
 
Aged 43 years
7/17/1835
 
Aged 1 year
7/1/1835
 
Aged 3 years
1/26/1835
Thursday last
 
Nancy (A slave of Mr. Isham Dyer)
6/29/1835
 
Aged 17 years
Nathan (A slave of S. H. Laughlin)
7/17/1835
 
Age 55 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 45 years
1/21/1835
1/17/1835
 
7/13/1835
 
Aged 1 year
6/19/1835
 
Aged 12 years
7/1/1835
 
Aged 31 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 1 year
7/27/1835
7/26/1835
About 30 years of age
7/17/1835
7/15/1835
Aged 59
7/8/1835
 
Aged 26 years
7/15/1835
7/13/1835
Aged 25 years
7/1/1835
 
Aged 28 years
6/24/1835
 
Aged 4 years
6/19/1835
 
Aged 12 years
7/8/1835
 
Aged 1 year
7/3/1835
 
Aged 10 years
Rooth, Infant child of Mr.
7/3/1835
 
Infant child
10/5/1835
10/3/1835
 
7/27/1835
7/24/1835
In the 50th year of her age
9/30/1835
9/15/1835
Aged 3 months
7/15/1835
 
Aged 28 years
10/23/1835
   
3/9/1835
Sunday evening last
 
6/19/1835
 
Aged 12 years
9/8/1835
9/2/1835
 
6/19/1835
   
Solomon (A slave of Lucy Bridleman)
7/20/1835
 
Aged 35 years
7/10/1835
7/8/1835
Aged 30 years
7/8/1835
 
Aged 9 years
6/29/1835
 
Aged 8 or 10 years
11/9/1835
11/2/1835
Aged 6 months and 6 days
7/13/1835
7/8/1835
In the 23rd year of his age
6/24/1835
 
Aged 2 years
7/8/1835
 
Aged 27 years
3/23/1835
3/21/1835
Aged 11
10/26/1835
10/14/1835
 
Wellington (A Free Black)
7/8/1835
 
Aged 2 years
7/8/1835
   
6/29/1835
 
Aged 25 years
7/24/1835
 
Aged 2
10/14/1835
Monday night last
 
6/24/1835
 
Aged 40 years
7/8/1835
7/7/1835
Aged 9 months

Return to top      


DEATH NOTICES FROM THE NASHVILLE BANNER AND NASHVILLE WHIG
FOR 1835

January 12, 1835
Died in this city on the 12th inst., Mrs. Harriett Johnson, wife of Joseph H. Johnson. The friends and acquaintances of the family are invited to attend her funeral tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock.

January 21, 1835
Died in Nashville on the 17th January, Col. John T. Nugent.

January 23, 1835
Died in this city on the 18th inst, William Lloyd in the 74th year of his age.

January 26, 1835
Died in Nashville on Thursday last, Mrs. Martha, consort of R. I. Moore, merchant.

February 13, 1835
Died on the 5th inst., in this city, Julia Ann Lafayette, eldest daughter of Mr. R. B. Phillips, in her tenth year.

February 13, 1835
Communicated: Died on Saturday, the 7th inst., Mr. J. J. McLaughlin, late of Hopkinsville, Ky.
The "Nashville Thespian Society" organized a few months since, has, by industry, perseverance and an upright and manly course, acquired for itself an enviable station, and become deep rooted in the affections of the first society of this place. Instituted for the purposes of instruction, of rendering amusement, and, above all, as an assistant to the charitable institutions of our town, it sought no other reward for its merits than the approbation of the public. If crowded and delighted audiences give any testimony in its favor, this it has most fully acquired. The task of the veteran actor has always been deemed most difficult; and years of arduous study and of intense application will along give him rank in the profession. What then must be the feeling of the novice, who for the first time "struts the stage" and what should be his reward should he prove successful? To brave public prejudice and put it down; to render that worthy of public esteem which has long been denounced in public opinion, is no common task. But why should we endeavor to vindicate that art "from the oppression which bears it down" which time has sanctioned and rendered holy?

It is for poetry, for scenic art, combined with the best efforts of the actor to render the surest estimate of human nature. It is for these to elevate the mind and carry it as it were far beyond itself. It is to these we look for a fair representation of ages long since past. It is on these we call when we would see the genius of men personified. It is on these we call when we would have "the mirror held to nature's view." We may look with wonder on the sculptured rock; the dumb inanimate image but speaks the artist's praise. We may gaze with admiration on the painted scene and wonder how it came; this too is inanimate. But when that picture is presented to us as a living thing, our minds are carried off and we revel with beings of another age. We view in varied passions - we pierce within the deep recesses of the soul and feel at once that nature, not art, "has placed her signet there to give assurance of a man."

The "Nashville Thespian Society" was yet in it infancy when a stranger came among them; this stranger was Mr. J. J. McLaughlin. He was received with open arms and at once admitted as a member. A modest unassuming deportment, but too often marks a narrow path to public favor. The proud, the reckless and the forward may obtain a station in public estimation while the modest one rests in oblivion. This was not the case with McLaughlin. His merits were at once observed and every heart beat with sympathy toward the stranger. To know that this was the case may in some degree alleviate the sorrow his friends feel on his untimely demise.

Among the most difficult and arduous characters of the drama is that of Bertram. It is dull, unnatural and void of that interest which characterizes the productions of Shakespeare, Otway, etc; and is consequently scarcely to be portrayed with effect. The tragedy appears rather to have emanated from the gloomy cell of some recluse than the halls of civilized society. The best actors of the age have shunned it from these causes, and it has fallen far below the level of tragedies now daily offered to the admiration of the public. Yet, notwithstanding all its defects, superior genius may give it an interest far beyond its merits. This was most especially the case on Thursday evening when Mr. McLaughlin undertook and sustained the character.

We have witnessed several representations of Bertram at the eastward and in our own town; both by regularly organized companies but never did a tragedy, however celebrated, or actors, however long their standing, make such an impression upon our mind as was made on Thursday evening. On the first appearance of Bertram, his commanding appearance made an impression on the audience that elicited a loud and general applause. The piece was carried through with the same result.

The first four acts were carried through without accident but at the conclusion of the fifth, Mr. McLaughlin, having accidentally changed a dagger which he had previously been using and which was sheathed in a scabbard, for one which was exceedingly sharp and being at the conclusion of the tragedy, unconscious of the change, unwittingly stabbed himself in a manner which proved fatal.

During his illness he was visited by the leading society of this place and a general feeling of sorrow and regret pervaded the town. He was buried on Sunday evening and followed to the grave by many of our principal citizens, together with many who had known and respected him while living. A Friend of McLaughlin and the Drama.

At a meeting of the Nashville Thespian Society held on the 9th day of February, 1835, it was Resolved that the members wear crape on the left arm for thirty days as a token of respect to the memory of their deceased friend and associate, J. J. McLaughlin. To Mr. and Mrs. John Broughton, the thanks of the friends of the deceased are due and cordially rendered for their unremitted kindness and attention to him during his last illness.

March 4, 1835
Died in Davidson County on the 25th February, Margaret Elizabeth, infant daughter of Richard Abbey.

March 9, 1835
Died in this place on Sunday evening last, Mrs. Elizabeth Sluder, wife of Mr. A. B. Sluder.

March 23, 1835
Died in this city on Saturday evening the 21st inst, William Franklin Treppard, aged 11, son of Mr. William Treppard.

April 17, 1835
Died on the 27th ult. at his residence near Nashville in the 61st year of his age, John Gower, Sr.,

May 8, 1835
Died on 26th April, Mary Ann Elizabeth Virginia Hite, child of Z. and Mary Hite.

May 20, 1835
Communicated: Obituary. Died, at 4 o'clock on the morning of Thursday, 15th May, after a severe illness of nearly four months, of inflammation of the lungs, Richard Crawford Howell, second son of Rev. R. B. C. Howell, Pastor of the Baptist Church in this city. The loveliness of the disposition, as well as the form of their little boy, the vigour of his previous health and the extraordinary maturity of his intellect, were marked by his fond parents, as so many indications of his future brilliancy of character and eminence among men. His filial affection and remarkable disposition to many gave them assurance equally strong, that should his life be spared, he would prove a comfort and support to their declining years. But like a bright meteor which blazes up, dazzles the eye of the beholder and the next moment vanishes forever, he is gone and the high hopes he had excited in the breast of those who loved him so fondly, are crushed in the dust. In this season of flowers, the fairest among them has withered and fallen. His afflicted parents bow but with heart of anguish, to this severe dispensation of Providence. They desire to kiss the hand which smites and with sincere hearts to respond "The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken awqy, blessed be the name of the Lord."

May 22, 1835
Died in this city, Anthony H. Ament and Helen M. Ament (See copy)

June 19, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville grave yard. (See copy)

June 22, 1835
Burial Under Arms. The State Guards of this city were on parade yesterday on a melancoly occasion, that of the burial of Sergeant John V. Cowardin who was on Thursday morning walking the streets with his usual lively and healthy appearance but before night on the same day was numbered among the pain and lifeless victims of that "scorge of nations" the cholera. Sergeant Cowardin was a young gentleman in may respects of more than ordinary promise. Of aspiring hopes and brilliant fancy, he had a taste for the beautiful and the spirit stirring in literature and was of that ardent temperament which aims at no middle course. He was by profession a Printer and at the time of his death attached to the American Presbyterian Office. His sudden exit has cast a gloom over his numerous acquaintances in that profession as well as over the minds of his friends at large.

The State Guards formed their line in Deaderick street at about eight o'clock in the morning and escourted the body of their fallen comrade followed by the deceased and the Nashville Typographical Society (of which he was a Vice President) as mourners to the Methodist church, where appropriate funeral services were performed and a sermon was delivered by the Rev. J. W. Hanner, after which the solomn procession, moving to the sound of dirges performed by a respectable band of music, wound its lengthening way to the field of graves. There was great solemnity in the appearance of the military, the officers and soldiers being in citizen's dress. The proud folds of the banner were not given to the winds. Bound to the standard by crape, it was elevated in the centre of the line like an ensign of sorrow. The wailing melody of the dirges and the low roll of the muffled drum added to the deep-toned emotion of the mourning which only reached its crisis when the State Guards laid their fellow soldier in his "narrow house" to await the resurrection roll-call when the "thunder drum" of heaven shall be beaten by the archangel.

"So strangely rolls that drum, so deep it echoes round: Old soldiers in their graves, to life start at the sound.
Both they in he farthest North, silent in ice, they lay, and with too warm espose beneath Italian clay.
Below the mud of Nile and beneath Arabian sand, their burial place they quit And soon to arms they stand."
At a meeting of the Nashville Typographical Society, held on the Evening of the 18th inst., consequent to the death of Mr. John V. Cowardin, the following resolution was unanimously adopted. That a meeting of the members be held on the following morning, the 19th, in order to participate with the newly organized "State Guards" in following in procession the body of their late lamented friend (of which he was a member) to the grave.

Return to top 

June 22, 1835
Burials in Nashville Burying Ground from 19th to morning of 22nd of June.

Friday 19th, Robert Bean, infant son of Edmund Bean, 3 years of age of cholera. Had previously been weakly and subject to other complaints.
Friday 19th, Grace Graham, a black woman, slave of Jesse Blackfan, aged 35, of cholera.
Saturday 20th, Jenney, slave of John Beaty, age 43 years, of measles.
Sunday 21st, Chaney, slave of B. Hodge, from the country, age 51 years, of cholera.
Sunday 21st, Robert, infant son of G. Akin, aged 3 years, of measles.

June 24, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville Burying ground (See copy)

June 29, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville Burying Ground (See copy)

July 1, 1835
List of burials in the Nashville burying ground since the publication of the Banner on June 29th..

Monday, 29th June, Jane Martin, infant daughter of a free black, aged 2 years, croup.
Mary Johnson, infant daughter of a pauper, aged 2 years, measles.
Thomas Pmelin, aged 28 years, from the country, died in the suburbs, cholera.
Tuesday, 30th June, Harriett Moore, aged 3 years, measles.
Sarah Harris, aged 16 years, died in the country, consumption.
John D. Pageat, aged 31 years, died at the Penitentiary, cholera.
Francis McCorpin, aged 24 years, died at the Penitentiary, cholera

July 3, 1835
List of burial in the Nashville burying ground since the publication of the Banner of the 1st July.

Wednesday, July 1, John Massie, aged 23 years, died in consequence of a pistol shot.
Wednesday, July 1, Eliza Rodden, aged 10 years, died in the S. E. Suburbs of cholera.
Tuesday, July 2, Harry L. Douglass, infant son of H. L. Douglass, Esq., aged 2 years of bowel complaint.
Tuesday, July 2, Mary, infant slave of Mrs. G. Paye, aged 2 years, worms.
Tuesday, July 2, An infant child of Mr. Rooth, bowel complaint.

Return to top

July 8, 1835
Died on the 7th July, at the resident of Gen. Gibbs in this county, John H. B. Yerger, infant son of Jacob S. Yerger, aged 9 months.

July 8, 1835
List of burials in the Nashville burying ground since the publication of the Tri-weekly Banner of the 3rd July.

Friday, July 3rd, Mary Patterson, aged 26 years, cholera.
Saturday, July 4th, Amy, a slave of David Morrison, aged 45 years, cholera.
Saturday, July 4, Jacob, from the country, slave of William Parham, aged 20 years, bowel complaint.
Sunday, July 5, Greenville White, from the Penitentiary, cholera.
Sunday, July 5, James Aykroyd, aged 25 years, effects of laudanum.
Monday, July 6, James Rhodes, aged 1 year, measles
Monday, July 6, Wellington, a free black, aged 2 years, measles.
Tuesday, July 7, Miss Stodder, aged 9 years, cholera.
Wednesday, July 8, John G. Titsworth, aged 27 years, cholera.
Wednesday, July 8, Maurice, a slave of Judge Kennedy, aged 22 years, consumption.

July 10, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville Burying Ground.

Wednesday, July 8, Elizabeth Spargo, wife of John D. Spargo, aged 30 years, cholera.
Thursday, July 9, George, a slave of James N. Meifee, aged 70 years, from the country, died in the suburbs, cholera.


July 13, 1835
List of Burial in the Nashville Burying Ground.

Friday, July 10, Dolly, a slave of Mrs. Talbot, aged 65, fever.
Saturday, July 11, Henry Nutt, infant son of James Nutt, aged 1 year, bowl complaint.
Sunday, July 12, Thomas Jefferson Barker, a free black, aged 32, cholera.
Monday, July 13, Harriet, slave of Col. S. H. Laughlin, aged 8 years, cholera.

Return to top 

July 13, 1835
Died in Nashville, Mr. Henry C. Spellman. Funeral this afternoon at 3 o'clock from his residence on Line street near Peck's spring. Service by the Rev. Talbot Fanning.

July 13, 1835
Died on the 11th inst, of cholera, Thomas Jefferson Barker, well known for many years in this city as an excellent barber and an upright and well behaved man of colour.

July 13, 1835
Communicated: Died on the 8th inst., Thomas A.Talbot, in the 23rd year of his age of a violent attack of the cholera, which he bore with calmness and fortitude. He has left a disconsolate mother and several helpless brothers and sisters to mourn his intimely end. With a mind highly polished by a collegiate education and extensive reading, he possessed a generous and open heart, a firmness and stability of character, which rendered him truly an object of interest to his numerous youthful associates. Though he died with no profession of the hope of immortality, yet his short and troublesome life has been one of constant piety.

July 15, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville Burying Ground.

Monday, July 13, Henry C. Skillman, aged 28, fever.
Monday, July 13, A slave belonging to Mr. Perry, aged 25, bilious fever.
Tuesday, July 14, Baswell Medley, aged 43 years, cholera.

July 17, 1835
List of burials in the Nashville Burying Ground.

Wednesday, July 15, Nathan, age 55 years, slave of S. H. Laughlin, cholera.
Thursday, July 16, N. S. Parmantier, aged 59, lingering illness. (See Obituary, July 17)
Friday, July 17, James M'Kinley, aged 1 year, bowel complaint.

July 17, 1835
Communicated: Departed this life on Wednesday, 15th July, in Nashville, Nicholas S. Parmantier, Esq., a native of France; at the time of his death, Professor of the French language and literature in the University of Nashville, aged 59 years. The life of this excellent man has been one of active usefulness in many situations - at an early age he was an officer under Napoleon whom he continued faithfully to serve during the whole of that afterwards Emperor's republican career. So ardently was he attached to the cause of freedom, that so soon as his favorite chief abandoned its service, he emigrated to the United States in which he arrived about 30 years ago. He resided for ten years in the city of Philadelphia and with the late Thomas Say, Esq., was one of the foundation members of the Academy of Natural Sciences of that place. During the last American war with Great Britain, he shouldered his musket as a volunteer private soldier and did his duty as such in the cause of the object of his greatest devotion - Freedom. From Philadelphia, he proceeded to Alabama, being one of the company who settled Demopolis in that State. He thence went to Pensacola in Florida, where he resided for ten years, and in which place the acquaintance of the writer of this article with him commenced. He entered my family about ten years ago and a close, intimate and minutely confidential friendship has existed between us for this whole period seldom equaled even between blood relations. His adopted children having removed from Pensacola to Nashville in the spring of 1830, he followed them the next year and has not left Tennessee since. Regarding with almost religious scruples, the express wish of the deceased, that his obituary should not be written with many words, the son of his adoption will only record upon paper what is deeply impressed upon many hearts, that Col. Parmantier has lived respected and ardently beloved by all who knew him well and died regretted and esteemed by the whole circle of his acquaintances.

July 20, 1835
Died in Franklin, Tennessee, Mr. Jacob Litton, aged about 18 years, son of Mr. Joseph Litton, merchant of Nashville. The remains of Mr. Litton were brought to this city and interred in the burying ground on Friday, 17th July, inst. Modest and unassuming, though intelligent and promising, Mr. Jacob Litton possessed in an eminent degree the affection and esteem of those who knew him. He had, as I believe, no enemies and many friends. The latter mourn his loss but find consolation in the conviction that he is an inheritor of endless happiness and while they feel acutely the affliction which is cast upon them, they will not forget to consider that "the Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away," and with contentment and a conviction of justice to add, "blessed be the name of the Lord."

July 20, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville Burying Ground

Friday, July 17, Jacob Litton, aged 18 years, of Nashville, died in Franklin, cholera.
Saturday, July 18, Mary Farmer, aged 25 years, intemperance.
Saturday, July 18, Maria, slave of Mary Denney, aged 3 years, fever.
Sunday, July 19, Solomon, slave of Lucy Bridleman, aged 35 years, cholera.

July 24, 1835
List of Burials in the Nashville Burying Ground

Tuesday, July 21, Henry Bigley, infant son of E. B. Bigley, aged 1 year, bowel complaint.
Thursday, July 23, Henry Woodfin, aged 2, bowel complaint.
Friday, July 24, Elizabeth Campbell, recently from Baltimore.

Return to top  

July 27, 1835
Died at the Fountain of Health, Davidson county on the evening of the 24th inst. in the 50th year of her age, of a protracted disease, Mrs. Sarah Saunders, consort of William Saunders, Esq. Mrs. Saunders was the daughter of the late Benj. Harris, Esq., of Powhatran county, Virginia where most of her relatives as well as those of Mr. Saunders now reside and came to this vicinity at an early day. She was a devoted wife and mother, an ardent friend and benevolent neighbor. Possessed of a high degree of fortitude, she could meet the world's vicissitudes with a proper forbearance, and looked forward to the close of her earthly career as one conscious of a well spent life. Although she had made no profession of religion, she had for many years previous to her decease, read, studied and diligently inquired after divine truth and the calm serenity of her closing moments, during which there was no distortion of a single muscle, gave evidence that her labor had not been in vain. Her death creates a vacuum not easily filled and her loss is deeply regretted by her sorrowing friends and relatives.

July 27, 1835
Died in this city on yesterday morning, Mr. John Parker, a native of Bedford County, Virginia and about thirty years of age. During his residence in this place, by his industrious and steady habits and correct deportment, he had acquired the confidence and esteem of all who knew him.

July 29, 1835
Died in Nashville on Monday, 27th July inst., Mrs. Margaret Childress, consort of George C. Childress, Esq., Editor of the National Banner. Possessing but a slight acquaintance with Mrs. Childress, we will merely say that she bore the character of a kind, amiable and accomplished lady and was universally beloved by her friends and esteemed and respected by her acquaintances.

September 8, 1835
General Sam G. Smith. (See copy)

September 28, 1835
Died in Nashville on Thursday, the 24th September, Mr. John Brown, an industrious, modest an ingenious mechanic, esteemed by all who knew him as one of our most useful citizens.

September 30, 1835
Died in Davidson County, Henry Clay Sims (See copy)

September 30, 1835
Died in this county, William Hays (See copy)

October 2, 1835
Died in this city on the 1st inst., Samuel R., infant son of Samuel P. Ament.

October 5, 1835
Died suddenly in Nashville on Saturday night, 3rd October inst., Mr. James S. Rowe, one of the managers of the Cincinnati, Louisville, Nashville and New Orleans theatres, much regretted and esteemed by his numerous friends and acquaintances.

October 14, 1835
Died on Monday night last in this city, Mr. T. J. Woodson of the firm of L. S. Green & Co.

October 14, 1835
Died on last evening, Charlotte S., daughter of Mr. Peter Chapouil of this city.

October 23, 1835
Died in this place, a few days since, Mr. Quinton Sloan, an honest and industrious mechanic whose death is lamented by all of his acquaintances.

October 26, 1835
Died in this city, Mrs. Susan Vaulx (See copy)

November 9, 1835
Died on the 2nd inst. at the residence of Thomas Stratton in this county, Anthony M., son of Madison and Mary Stratton, aged 6 months and 6 days.

November 27, 1835
Died on Thursday the 26th of November at the residence of James T. Holman, Esq., Southfield, Nashville of small pox, Mrs. Rachel Boyd, widow of the late Col. Richard Boyd, deceased, in the 45th year of her age.

Return to top      

Click on images of these pages below to see enlargements

obits-1835-p1

Return to top      


obit-1835-p2

Return to top

obit-1835-p3

Return to top      

The Nashville City Cemetery Association, Inc.
P.O. Box 150733
Nashville, TN 37215


© Copyright 2006 - Nashville City Cemetery Association

HOMEE | LOCATION | EVENTS | GIFT SHOP | HISTORY | JOIN US | ABOUT US
INSCRIPTIONS | HISTORIC MAPS | NEWSLETTERS | LINKS | DESCENDANTS | CONTACT US